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Episode 135: “If you can’t annoy somebody, there’s little point in writing.”

By Jasmin and Mariann — August 11, 2012

Welcome to the 135th episode of Our Hen House, featuring Katya Lidsky of the play, “I’m Sorry: How An Apologist Became An Activist,” as well as special guest Eric Milano

In today’s episode, we will make you jealous with our account of the Goodwill outlet store – yes, outlet! – right by our new Portland digs, and we’ll discuss the restaurant supply store that sells fresh produce en masse, and for cheap – and how that stacks up to farmer’s markets and supporting local farmers. We will also tell you all about the BlogHer conference, where Jasmin spoke last week in New York City, and you’ll hear the sob story of a delusional attendee who made it very clear how much she hated animals. Back in Portland, Mariann was busy preparing for the Animals in Agriculture class she is going to be teaching at Lewis & Clark Law School, and she’ll give us some interesting updates and share some ruminations.

Joining us today is Katya Lidsky, whose one-woman play, “I’m Sorry: How an Apologist Became an Activist,” which opened in Los Angeles last year, is now making its way to the Big Apple (don’t miss the August 26 show, which is being dedicated to Our Hen House!). Katya will talk about how she has memorialized her veganism and her animal activism in this incredibly creative way, and will chat with us further about the unique role that the arts can play when it comes to changing the world.

For our review, 2-time Emmy Award nominee Eric Milano will join us to give us his take on the Austrian documentary, The Trial, which tells the story of several animal rights activists in search of justice, who find themselves in a legal battle.

All that, vegan banter, and of course, current events from the world of animal rights.

This week’s news items include:

“If you can’t annoy somebody, there’s little point in writing.” -Kingsley Amis

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(3) Readers Comments

  1. August 13, 2012 at 7:54 am

    Whenever I get a "I want all animals to die and fry" response, I think of it as the child in the person responding. So I talk to that by saying, "poor pigs" or "poor fishes". One could give a reasoned explanation but that is not the place they are talking from.

    • August 14, 2012 at 1:14 am

      You're an inspiration, Kirsten. That's a very compassionate way to look at it. Good for you. xo

  2. Jean Engstrand
    January 4, 2014 at 11:54 am

    I just caught this podcast. I wish there had been other replies, because we can all use some tips about how to respond to a situation like that. Kirsten's reply was great. Would it also be appropriate to look directly at the person with a sympathetic eye and say "I'm so sorry. I can't imagine what could have happened that created such hatred toward innocent beings." For me, if the person hung around long enough (which they usually don't), I might relate a similar story from my recent past. "This reminds me of the time I was sitting in a bar sharing a beer with my husband when a man we had never seen before sat down next to us and declared 'Niggers are worthless. They should all be cut up into little pieces and burned.'" (True story) Then I guess I would drop it, and calmly move on to something else. Of course, when these things happen I don't have enough presence of mind to do anything sensible!



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